A stroll down the Boulevadier

The Boulevardier appears in Harry MacElhone’s 1927 book, Barflies & Cocktails. It was equal parts bourbon, sweet vermouth, and Campari, and so named for a socialite American who frequented the bar and owned a magazine called The Boulevardier (or so the story goes). That naming habit — and the drink’s formula — was apparently a regular thing for MacElhone, who would later invent another riff on the drink called the Old Pal, using rye, dry vermouth, and Campari, and name it for a sports writer he referred to as his ‘old pal’.

Boulevardier
Print Recipe

Boulevardier

  1. Stir down all ingredients with ice, then strain over good block ice in an old fashioned glass (or serve it up — as we have here — and train into a chilled cocktail glass).

The Boulevardier appears in Harry MacElhone’s 1927 book, Barflies & Cocktails. It was equal parts bourbon, sweet vermouth, and Campari, and so named for a socialite American who frequented the bar and owned a magazine called The Boulevardier (or so the story goes). That naming habit — and the drink’s formula — was apparently a regular thing for MacElhone, who would later invent another riff on the drink called the Old Pal, using rye, dry vermouth, and Campari, and name it for a sports writer he referred to as his ‘old pal’.

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