Ingredient: absinthe

The Black Thorn.

This Black Thorn is all about Irish whiskey

A good drop of the Irish — something with a bit of weight to it — is ideal for mixing. Not as big in the mix as rye, nor as smoky as some Scotch, Irish whiskey hits that Goldilocks quotient of being ‘just right’, as it is here in the Black Thorn.

Remember the Maine recipe

The Remember the Maine is one of those drinks that has undergone a name change…

The Corpse Reviver No. 2

The Corpse Reviver (No. 2)

Designed as a ‘pick me up’ or hangover cure as, as the name suggests, the Corpse Reviver No. 2 is a once forgotten ‘classic’ that has returned from the land of the long dead cocktail with a vengeance. This well balanced beverage has a delicate harmony of flavours that is proving to be popular once again amongst the cocktailian set.

The New Pal

The New Pal recipe from Absinthe Brasserie & Bar

This New Pal recipe comes from the Absinthe Brasserie & Bar in San Francisco. Their New Pal employs a couple of old skool additions like a dash of Herbsaint (we’ve used absinthe) and Peychuad’s bitters. Like the Boulevardier, Hollinger and Schwartz have favoured sweet vermouth over dry, but opted for a straight rye whiskey as opposed to Canadian. Adding a dash of absinthe to a cocktail is a decidedly 19th century trait but the New Pal refreshes MacElhone’s recipe by citing resurging popular ingredients (at least amongst bartenders) namely the rye whiskey component.

Morning Glory Fizz

Morning Glory Fizz

Johnson’s Morning Glory Fizz recipe calls for Scotch, sugar, lime and lemon juices, egg white, “syphon selters or vichy water” and a few of dashes of absinthe. Embury, notorious for the strength of his drink recipes, calls for a full “pony” or 30ml of absinthe. The recipe displayed below is a trade off between the two.

Dale DeGroff's Sazerac

Dale DeGroff’s Sazerac

Like Bourbon Street, Jazz and Creole cooking, the Sazerac cocktail is quintessentially New Orleans. Supposedly…